zoë lescaze

zoe lescaze

Zoe Lescaze

PALEOART: VISIONS OF THE PREHISTORIC PAST

By Zoë Lescaze with a preface by Walton Ford (TASCHEN, 2017)

“A gorgeous volume… As much as Lescaze’s Paleoart is a book about scientific discovery and artistic invention, it is also a history of artists grappling with the reality of extinction, and may be more relevant now than ever.” —Rachel Poser, The New York Times Book Review

Paleoart, a new book by Zoë Lescaze, is one of the most extraordinary and beautiful volumes on the topic yet conceived, and suggests that these images of prehistory were as much about the present as the past.” —Caspar Henderson, The Economist

“Epic in size and scope, it's a passport to a past that no one ever witnessed.” —Erin, Blakemore, The Washington Post

“Flipping through Paleoart feels, in the best way, like taking a psychoactive substance and becoming a kid again.” —Dan Piepenbring, The Paris Review

When many people hear “paleoart,” they picture woolly mammoths painted on cave walls thousands of years ago. Paleoart is a relatively new genre, though, one that began in the early nineteenth century when scientists first began imagining how prehistoric animals looked in life. Paleoart is the practice of robing fossil bones in scales and skin, and this book collects some of the most dazzling examples of a fascinating unsung genre. 


The first image of the prehistoric world: Duria antiquior, a small watercolor painted by the English scientist Henry Thomas De la Beche around 1830.